It’s Time to Mentor

Accelerating progress through mentorship

By Orpheas Katsikis for the Interintellect

Image for post
Image for post

Be inspired by others

I’ve been mulling over this article for a while now and it’s an article that came both out of personal experiences mentoring younger people, as well as out of a synthesis of ideas from people I respect. Ideas that, serendipitously, were tweeted — time-wise — very close to each other…

  1. Mason Hartman: “[…] a bunch of social problems are actually unsolved technical problems.”
  2. Nathan Baschez: “[…] access to coaching/mentors may be one of the biggest bottlenecks to human flourishing”
Image for post
Image for post

Be a mentor and a mentee

History holds several examples of mentorship relationships that helped inspire, drive, teach, and allow mentees to reach greater heights. Alexander The Great was mentored by Aristotle. Aristotle himself was mentored by Plato. Albert Einstein was first exposed to science by family friend Max Talmey. Marie Curie had Gabriel Lippmann. And Bill Gates himself credits part of his success to his mentor, Warren Buffet.

Image for post
Image for post
Toni Morrison, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993 with Tracy K. Smith, the 22nd Poet Laureate of the United States

A lot of social problems are, in essence, unsolved technical problems and the current cap on human flourishing, is nothing more than the current limits of science; in practice, our current capacity to solve technical problems

Supporting the builders

Marc Andreessen recently put out a call-to-arms for builders across technological and political circles. A call-to-arms for us to gather together, work together to build things — things that will push society forward….

Image for post
Image for post
“In Greek mythology, Mentor was a loyal friend and adviser to Odysseus, king of Ithaca. Mentor helped raise Odysseus’ son, Telemachus, while Odysseus was away fighting the Trojan War. Mentor became Telemachus’ teacher, coach, counselor and protector, building a relationship based on affection and trust.” (Source)

The two types of mentoring

Raising another’s aspirations and showing them how to achieve them provides asymmetrically high-returns. As Tyler Cowen puts it: “This is in fact one of the most valuable things you can do with your time and with your life.”

Image for post
Image for post
Two pioneers of French feminist philosophy: Simone de Beauvoir with a young Élisabeth Badinter

We owe it to ourselves and our communities — our tribes — to act as mentors as well as to enhance the place of mentors in society.

Direct mentorship is a one-to-one relationship between mentor and mentee. The mentor has the opportunity to better tailor her advice to her mentee, and the mentee is able to ask and discuss specific issues that trouble her.

Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Bill Gates and Warren Buffett — two masters of longterm thinking

Mentorship is a gift — to mentor and mentee, both — and we need to use it to push others upwards.

We owe it to ourselves and our communities — our tribes — to act as mentors as well as to enhance the place of mentors in society. It’s an activity that society deeply needs, but doesn’t know how to ask for.

Written by

We host the most interesting conversations on the internet. http://interintellect.com and http://twitter.com/interintellect_

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store